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Lurcher Types

When looking for a type of lurcher there are many things to consider;

  • the game to be pursued

  • the terrain it will be working

then there's personal preferences/choice

  • short/smooth/broken/rough coated

  • height

  • appearance

  • dog/bitch

  • pup or already running

Below is a list of dog breeds used in the make-up of lurchers, each has been used at one time or another to add certain qualities to the breed.

If you are looking for certain qualities in a lurcher, I hope this list will help you decide which cross would best suit the land you hunt on.

LIST

Afghan Hound American Pit Bull Terrier Australian Cattle Dog Australian Kelpie Beagle Bearded Collie Bedlington Terrier Border Collie Borzoi Bull Terrier Collie (Rough & Smooth) German Shepherd Greyhound Ibezan Hound Irish Wolfhound Italian Greyhound Pharaoh Hound Saluki Staghound Whippet

Afghan Hound

The Afghan Hound is a sight hound with an aristocratic bearing. Tall and slender with a long, narrow, refined head, silky topknot and powerful jaws. The occiput is quite prominent. The muzzle is slightly convex ("Roman nose") with a black nose. There is little or no stop. The teeth should meet in a level or scissors bite. The dark eyes are almond shaped. The ears lie flat to the head. The neck is long and strong. The height at the withers should be almost level and the abdomen well tucked up. The hipbones are quite prominent. The front legs are strong and straight and the feet are large and covered with long hair. The tail has a curl or ring at the tip, but is not carried over the back. The long, rich, silky coat is most often the colour of sand with a darker face and ear fringes, though all colours are permitted. White markings, however, are discouraged.

Temperament

Dignified, somewhat aloof, but very sweet, loyal, affectionate and sensitive, with a low dominance level. They must be trained kindly. The Afghan has been described as "a king of dogs."   Majestic, elegant, noble and courageous, suspicious of, but not hostile to, strangers. Although tough, they will pine if they are deprived of attention. They will do best with older, considerate children. At one time, the breed had a reputation for being untrustworthy, but has now been replaced by a character that, while still spirited, is said to be more amenable to training and discipline, as they can be disobedient if it is poorly trained. This breed can be difficult to housebreak. Some are timid and high strung.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 27 to 29 inches (68.58-73.66cm) slightly less for bitches.

Weight: 58-64lb (26-34kg.)

Health Problems

Generally healthy, the Afghan has a low pain tolerance, thereby suffering even with minor injuries.

Living Conditions

The Afghan Hound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with acreage. This breed can live in or outdoors, although it would be happier sleeping indoors.

Exercise

Afghan Hounds love open spaces and must be allowed to run free in a safe area as well as having long daily walks. It needs a minimum of 30 minutes of free galloping per day.

Life Expectancy

About 14 years.

Grooming

The long, thick coat demands a great deal of attention.  When showing there is a must to bath once a week. Do not brush in-between baths in order to keep coat long and shiny. Brushing a dry coat will damage the coat and even make it more easily  matted.  Weekly baths are not as important if your Afghan is a pet and will not be shown, but doing so will make the coat less matted and will save you time in the end.  Many wear snoods indoors to protect their ears from food bowls. A special air-cushioned brush or pinbrush is useful for grooming. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

This is a very ancient dog, native to Sinai, and mentioned several times in Egyptian papyruses as well as pictured in the caves of northern Afghanistan more than 4000 years ago. The breed was kept pure for centuries, and its exportation was always prohibited. It therefore only reached Europe as contraband early in this century.  This elegant sight hound was used as a shepherd and hunter of many types of game including deer, wild goats, and even wolves and snow leopards. They were also used by shepherds as herders and watchdogs. An extremely fast and agile runner, the Afghan Hound pursues game by sight. His thick coat protects against temperature extremes. In Europe and America he has become a luxurious pet because of his aristocratic beauty. Some of the Afghan's talents are hunting, sighting, tracking, herding, watch-dogging, racing, and lure coursing.

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American Pit Bull Terrier

The Pit Bull immediately strikes one as being a dog of power, passion, and undying willingness. The brick-like head, which is especially broad between the cheeks (to house the powerful jaws), is carried upon a thickly muscled, well-defined neck. The neck runs into a deep, thick, well-sprung chest. The American Pit Bull is a very muscular, stocky, yet agile dog which is extremely strong for his size. The ears are generally cropped, though this is optional. Docked tails are not accepted by the UKC or the ADBA. The eyes are round, and any colour is acceptable. The teeth should form a scissors bite. Its coat is made up of thick, short, shiny hair. All colours are admissible. The tail tapers to a point.

Temperament

That sly smile, those determined eyes, that unwaning pleasure to please... the mere quality and characteristics of the APBT have evoked more human emotional, rational, and irrational response than any other breed that exists today.  By no means are these dogs people-haters or people-eaters. Their natural aggressive tendencies are toward other dogs and animals, not people. However if they are properly socialized they will not even be aggressive with them. These are truly quality companions for quality owners only! The American Pit Bull Terrier is a good-natured, amusing, extremely loyal and affectionate family pet, which is good with children and adults. Almost always obedient, it is always eager to please its master. It is an extremely courageous and intelligent guard dog that is very full of vitality. Highly protective of his owners and the owner's property, it will fight an enemy to the death. It is usually very friendly, but has an uncanny ability to know when it needs to protect and when everything is okay. The American Pit Bull Terrier can be wilful and needs a firm hand. They are generally okay with other pets if they are raised with them from puppy hood.  For the most part they are very friendly, but not recommended for most people. Excellent with children in the family, they have a high pain tolerance and will happily put up with rough child play. As with any breed, they should not be left alone with unfamiliar children. Originally used as fighting dogs, the powerful American Pit Bull may go for the throat of strange dogs. A minimum of training will produce a tranquil, obedient dog. Socialize very thoroughly when young to combat aggressive tendencies and be sure to keep the dog under control when other dogs are present. It has given outstanding results as a guardian of property, but is at the same time esteemed as a companion dog. When properly trained and socialized, this is a very good dog and a great family companion. Unfortunately, some choose to promote the fighting instinct in the breed, giving it a bad name.

Height, weight

Height: 18-22 inches (46-56 cm)
Weight: 22 -110 pounds (10-50 kg)

Please Note: The APBT ranges in size from 22 pounds to 110 pounds (rare), with the most common being between 35 - 55 pounds (16-25 kg.), in fact the original APBT's were between 20 - 40 pounds (9-18 kg.) and were bred small for their main purpose, fighting, These dogs are varying from small to extra large.  A very common misconception is that APBT's are muscle bound (viscous) hulks that weigh in around 85 pounds (39 kg.) and this is generally not the majority, Most of the APBT's that Are that large have been crossed with another breeds.

Health Problems

A generally healthy breed, although some are prone to hip dysplasia, hereditary cataracts, allergies to grass and congenital heart disease.

Living Conditions

It will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard provided they get enough exercise. Prefers warm climates.

Exercise

American Pit Bull Terriers must have plenty of regular exercise, but keep them leashed in public to avoid fights with other dogs.

Life Expectancy

About 12 years.

Grooming

The smooth, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Brush regularly with a firm bristle brush, and bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. A rub with a piece of towelling or chamois will make the coat gleam. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

Developed from the Bull and Terrier types of yesteryear, the American Pit Bull Terrier comes from an indisputable history of pit-fighting. The breed's tenacity and accompanying strength are unmatched in the canine world. As rich and captivating as the breed's history is, the Pit Bull's future is more worthy of commentary. Some proponents of the breed argue that this breed is the original bulldog of the past. Old prints and woodcarvings show reason to believe this. They show dogs that look exactly like the breed today, doing things the dog is still capable of doing.  For more information on this theory you can read books by Richard F Stratton. The APBT, as registered by the UKC, is an individual breed of dog and does not refer to just any ill-bred, mindless warrior-type mongrel. At one time, the Pit Bull was a much loved, trustworthy companion. People who chose to train these dogs to fight are chiefly responsible for the banning and witch-hunting that has been sweeping the U.S. The media, however, should not go unmentioned, for it is also responsible for escalating isolated incidences in a relentless and attention-getting way. In a lot of cases when the media is reporting about a Pit Bull attacking, it is indeed not even a Pit Bull at all, but a mixed breed of some sort, or another bull breed all together. In fact, one time there was a report on KYW news in Philadelphia about two Pit Bulls attacking a person. I called the news station and asked if they knew the dogs were in fact a pure bred American Pit Bull Terriers, or another bull breed of some sort, or a mutt for that matter. They told me they did not know, I would have to call the police station to verify that information. I asked them how they could report something that they were not sure of. They had no answer for me and they were not sure of the dog's breed. Even after admitting that to me on the phone, they kept calling it a Pit Bull. The Pit Bull's future has been perhaps irreparably undone and everyone is to blame except the dog itself. This very loyal dog is too set on pleasing his owner, and ironically this is the root of his own undoing. Accompanying this need to please are remarkable abilities of all kinds. Jack Dempsy, Teddy Roosevelt and Jack Johnson are just a few people who have owned Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls excel in practically every canine task including herding, guarding, hunting, policing, cart pulling and ratting. A Pit Bull, named Banddog Dread, holds more canine working titles than ANY other breed. The owner's name is Diane Jessup and you can reference her book, "The Working Pit Bull." It tells you all of Dread's accomplishments. These dogs are truly capable of many tasks.

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Australian Cattle Dog

The Australian Cattle Dog, also known as the Australian Heeler, Hall's Heeler, Queensland Heeler and the Blue Heeler, is a sturdy, compact working dog, well-muscled, powerful, yet very agile. The body is a bit longer than high with a slightly curved tail reaching approximately to the hock. The front legs should be perfectly straight when viewed from the front. The head is broad and slightly rounded between the widely set, moderately pointed pricked ears. The oval eyes are dark brown. The teeth should meet in a scissors bite. The weather-resistant double coat consists of a short dense undercoat and a short straight outer coat. It comes in blue or red speckled. The blue speckled is with or without black, blue or tan markings on the head with tan points. Black markings on the body are not desirable. The red speckle variety should be evenly speckled all over, but may have darker markings on the head.

Temperament

A working, herding breed, the Australian Cattle Dog is not suited to life alone in the backyard. One of the most intelligent breeds, it can become easily bored, leading to serious behaviour problems. These dogs need to be part of the action! They are loyal, protective and alert. An excellent guard dog. Brave and trustworthy. Very good in the obedience ring and in herding and agility. Firm training from the start and lot of daily attention will produce a fine and happy pet. It is absolutely loyal and obedient to its master, but it is something of a one-person dog. They are sometimes suspicious of people and dogs they don't know. It can be very dog aggressive, for its dominance level is high. Not good with children except for family members it has known since puppy hood. Some tend to nip at people's heels in an attempt to herd them. If you are buying a pet, avoid strictly working lines, as these dogs may be too active and intense for home life. Australian Cattle Dogs are very easy to train. Puppies are born white (inherited from the early Dalmatian crosses), but the adult colour can be seen in the paw pads.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 17-20 inches (43-51cm) Bitches 17-19 inches (43-48cm)
Weight: Dogs 32-35 pounds (15-16kg) Bitches 30-35 pounds (14-16kg)

Health Problems

Prone to hip dysplasia, PRA, and deafness.

Living Conditions

Not recommended for apartment life and does best with at least a large yard.

Exercise

These animals have incredible stamina and will enjoy all the activity you can give them. Exercise is of paramount importance - without enough they can become bored and destructive.

Life Expectancy

About 12-15 years.

Grooming

The short-haired, weather-resistant coat needs little care and is very easy to groom. Just comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and bathe only when necessary. This breed tends to shed their coats once or twice per year (depending on sex status and region).

Origin

The Australian Cattle Dog was developed by pioneer settlers in the 19th century to herd cattle on large ranches. Dogs the settlers brought with them from Europe, called Smithfield and the Old Smooth Collie (not the smooth collie known today), were not able to handle the long distances and inhospitable climate of the new continent. So ranchers began experimenting with new crosses. The Australian Cattle Dog primarily derived from a mix of smooth, blue speckled Collie imports from Scotland and wild Australian Dingoes. Australian Kelpie, Dalmatian, and Bull Terrier were also added. The result was an excellent herding dog, with few equals, who worked the stock quietly yet forcefully, willing and able to drive cattle across vast distances under harsh, hot dusty conditions. With superior stamina, it was well suited to Queensland. Both its guarding and herding instincts are very strong and may extend to people and other animals. Robert Kaleski drew up a standard for the breed in 1893, which was finally approved in Australia in 1903. The Australian Cattle Dog was fully recognized by the AKC in 1980. The Australian Cattle Dog has also been known as the Australian Heeler, Hall's Heeler, Queensland Heeler or Blue Heeler. "Heeler" refers to its herding skill of snapping and biting cattle's heels. Its talents are retrieving, herding, guarding, agility, competitive obedience, and performing tricks.

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Australian Kelpie

The Australian Kelpie has a compact body and well-developed limbs. Slightly longer than he is tall, the Kelpie has a broad chest and firm hind quarters that contribute to his flexible, energized appearance. The head is long and narrow. The medium length tail is low set. The short, compact feet have well arched toes. The double coat consists of a short and dense undercoat and a hard, straight and weather-repellent outer coat. Colour possibilities include black and red, each with or without out tan; and fawn, chocolate and blue. Kelpie owners are more interested in the breed's working ability then their appearance.

Temperament

A compact, robust, enthusiastic, and tireless working dog. Excellent at herding, the Australian Kelpie is the most popular and successful working dog. Kelpies are devoted one-man dogs but far too work-oriented and energetic for a house or apartment existence. Their easy trainability and keenness on the job make them a fundamental component of the Australian work force. They are ready to respond immediately to any signal given by its master, even from a great distance. They are good with children when they are raised with them from puppy hood. Kelpies will try to herd other dogs, pets and animals whether they want to be herded or not. This workaholic will work until it drops. They are independent and in business for themselves rather than for pleasing a handler. Boredom is the breed's doom and the owner's as well. In their native country of Australia, Kelpies work all day even in intense heat, covering 1,000 to 4,000-plus acres. The breed uses "eye" similar to the Border Collie's on the tractable stock, but utilizes its nipping ability to turn more stubborn cattle. Kelpies can muster thousands of sheep from pasture to pen to truck. When a flock of sheep is packed as tight as Times Square on New Year's Eve, they will look for the shortest way to the other side, which is usually in a straight line. This very clever Kelpie will jump on the back of the nearest sheep and run lightly across the flock to reach the other side. They make excellent watchdogs and can also be trained as seeing-eye dogs. The Australian Kelpie is not an aggressive dog, but he can be protective when needed, and will guard his family and their belongings when necessary, regardless of the risk to himself.

Height, Weight

Height: 17-20 inches (43-51 cm.)
Weight: 25-45 pounds (11-20 kg.)

Health Problems

Beware of PRA= Progressive Retinal Atrophy - retinal degeneration causing partial to total blindness.

Living Conditions

The Australian Kelpie is not recommended for apartment life. They are working dogs that need plenty of open space to run and will be happiest with a job to do. Their all-weather coat allows them to live where it is hot as well as where it is cold. They will be content to live outdoors with adequate shelter.

Exercise

The Australian Kelpie is a working dog that demands a great deal of exercise, preferably with some kind of job to do. Their energy levels are extremely high!! They are workaholics and will run until they drop!!

Life Expectancy

About 10-14 years.

Grooming

This breed is easy to groom. An occasional combing and brushing is all that it needs. Bathe only when necessary as it will remove the natural oils in the weather-resistant coat and dry out the skin. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

Although many still believe the Kelpie is a Dingo crossed with the Border Collie, more accurate documentation reveals the breed's development from English North Country Collies of the Rutherford strain. These hardy British working herders, like many sheepdogs, were imported to Australia during the latter half of the 19th century. Today nearly 100,000 Kelpies are employed on that continent. Despite their relatively small size, Kelpies are without limitations, capable of working cattle, goats, poultry and reindeer. They will excel in competitive obedience. The name "Kelpie" comes from the water kelpie mentioned by Robert Louis Stevenson, the Scottish writer, in the novel Kidnapped. This breed has been known since 1870.

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Beagle

A hardy, sturdy squarely-built, small hound, the Beagle has a sleek, easy-care, short coat in tri-colour, red and white, orange and white, or lemon and white. The coat is close, hard and of medium length. The beagle looks like a small English Foxhound. The skull is broad and slightly rounded, and the muzzle is straight and square. The feet are round and strong. The black nose has full nostrils for scenting. The long, wide ears are pendant. The brown or hazel eyes have a characteristic pleading expression. The tail is carried gaily, but never curled over the back.

Temperament

The Beagle is a gentle, sweet, lively and curious dog that just loves everyone! A happy little tail-wagger! Sociable, brave and intelligent. Calm and loving. Excellent with children and generally good with other dogs, but should not be trusted with non-canine pets, unless they are socialized with cats and other household animals when they are young. Beagles have minds of their own. They are determined and watchful and require patient, firm training. This breed doesn't like being left alone. Consider buying two if you will be gone a lot. A Beagle has a loud baying cry that was a delight to hunting horsemen, but can be disturbing to family and neighbours. Beagles have a tendency to follow their own noses. They may take off on their own exploration if let off their leash in an unfenced area.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 14-16 inches (36-41cm) Bitches 13-15 inches (33-38cm)
There are two height classes, 13-15 inches (33-38cm) and under 13 inches (33cm).
Weight: Dogs 22-25 pounds (10-11kg) Bitches 20-23 pounds (9-10kg)

Health Problems

Some lines can be prone to heart disease, epilepsy, eye and back problems. Also prone to chondroplasia, aka dwarfism (warped front legs, like a Basset's). You can see an example of his condition by looking at Bently's photo at the top of this page.

Living Conditions

Beagles will do okay in an apartment if they get plenty of chances to be outdoors. They are very active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient.

Exercise

Energetic and possessing great stamina, the Beagle needs plenty of exercise, but a yard of reasonable size will take care of most of its requirements. A brisk daily walk will cover the rest. Always use a lead when walking this breed or you will be running the risk of it disappearing in search of wild game.

Life Expectancy

About 12-15 years.

Grooming

The Beagle's smooth short-haired coat is easy to look after. Brush with a firm bristle brush, and bathe with mild soap only when necessary. Dry shampoo occasionally.  Be sure to check the ears carefully for signs of infection and keep the nails trimmed. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

The Beagle is one of the most popular scent hounds because of his energy, willingness, and merry, sweet disposition. The breed probably originated as a cross between the Harrier and other hounds in England. The Beagle has been used in packs, alone, and in pairs, for hunting hare, pheasant and quail. He has also served as an excellent narcotics detection dog and makes a fine family companion. Unfortunately, because they are fairly uniform in size and small, Beagles are often used for medical experimentation.

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Bearded Collie

The Bearded Collie, or "Beardie" as he is known to his fanciers, is a medium-sized, agile, herding dog with a shaggy coat and an ever-wagging tail. He is an ancestor of the Old English Sheepdog, and the family resemblance is obvious. The Beardie has a broad head, short muzzle and a shaggy coat all over his body, even under the chin (hence the name "Beardie"). Beneath the dense, weatherproof outer coat lies a thick, soft undercoat. Its head and teeth are large. The eyes are wide set and harmonious in colour with its coat, set high on its head and pendent. The ears lie close to the head and the tail is long and carried low unless the dog is excited. The Beardie is robust, hardy and active, but not massive. The colour of the coat changes several times over the life of the dog. Puppies are generally born black, brown, fawn or blue. The puppy coat then fades to light grey or cream. As the dogs reach maturity, they darken again to their adult coat in any of the four colours, black, brown, blue, or fawn. The final coat colour is somewhere between the puppy coat and the yearling coat.

Temperament

Known for his "bounce," the exuberant Beardie will charm you with his joyous, affectionate, happy-go-lucky ways. He is playful and lively with an always wagging tail.  The perfect companion for children. Enthusiastic, stable and self-confident. Males tend to be more bold and outgoing, while females tend to be calmer and more submissive. The Beardie needs to be with people and not left alone without anything to do. They are humorous and high-energy dogs. Very trainable for many activities. Obedience training is a must as Beardies think a lot and can be headstrong at times. The Beardie is a natural herder of people and animals. They are noisy barkers, but are not watch dogs. They should not be shy or aggressive.

Height, Weight

Height:  20-22 inches (51-56cm.)
Weight:  40-60 pounds (18-27 kg.)

Health Problems

Generally healthy. Beware of hip dysplasia. Their dense coat may conceal external parasite infestation.

Living Conditions

The Bearded Collie is not recommended for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. Beardies can sleep outdoors and make excellent farm dogs. They are also good in windy, rugged or wet areas since the dogs will go out in all weather conditions. It does not like to be confined and should have a place to run off of its lead. The Beardie prefers to be outdoors.

Exercise

This is an active dog that needs lots of exercise, preferably running free.

Life Expectancy

About 14-15 years.

Grooming

Daily brushing of the long, shaggy coat is important. Mist the coat lightly with water before you begin. Tease out mats before they get bad, and give extra attention when the dog is shedding. Use the comb sparingly. If you prefer, the coat can be professionally machine-clipped every two months or so. Eyes, ears and paws should be checked daily. Bath or dry shampoo when necessary. It is difficult to locate ticks in the thick undercoat, so check regularly. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

The Bearded Collie is a descendant of the Polish Sheepdog (the Polski Owczarek Nizinny or PON) which was first introduced into Scotland in 1514 by a Polish sea captain who traded three of his dogs to a Scottish shepherd for a valuable ram and ewe. The dogs were bred with local herding stock and this formed the foundation for the Bearded Collie breed. For Centuries, the Beardie was used in Scotland as a herder of both sheep and cattle, and was known variously as the "Highland Sheepdog," the "Highland Collie," and the "Hairy Moved Collie." Collie is the Scottish word for herding dog, derived from the "colley" or "coaley" black-faced sheep. The name Bearded Collie comes from the long hair under the Beardie's chin which flows into the chest, forming a "beard." The Beardie's lovable personality and appearance makes him an ideal companion and family dog. The breed almost disappeared in the early part of the twentieth century, but was rescued through mating a pair in 1944. It is still not very widespread. Still fairly rare in the United States, the first US litter of Beardies was whelped in 1967. The Bearded Collie is in all likelihood related to the bobtail (Old English Sheepdog). It is very similar although the Beardie is smaller, leaner and has an undocked tail. Some of the Beardie's talents are tracking, herding, agility, competitive obedience, and performing tricks.

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Bedlington Terrier

It has been described as a dog with the heart of a lion and the appearance of a lamb. With his pear-shaped head, arched back and curly coat, the Bedlington Terrier in fact does look like a little sheep. The head has no stop, descending in an unbroken line from crown to nose. The eyes are small and deep set. It has a pointed tail and straight front legs with hare-like feet. The thick double coat is a mixture of soft and harsher hairs and comes in blue, liver or sandy. The dog may have tan markings over the eyes and on the legs, chest and rear. The Bedlington has a unique springy gait, particularly when moving slowly.

Temperament

Careful breeding has resulted in a more companionable and affectionate personality in today's Bedlington Terriers. Playful and cheerful, the Bedlington Terrier is loving with children and fairly friendly with strangers. They are loyal, lively and headstrong. This breed needs to learn to like cats and other household animals when they are young. Usually they can get along with other dogs but keep them away from those that want to dominate, as once challenged they are terrifying fighters, despite their gentle appearance. A little powerhouse, it is courageous and energetic, with the ability to run very fast. It is an enthusiastic digger. Bedlingtons like to bark and can be high-stung. Only let this breed off its lead in an enclosed area. Like the Whippet, he is fast and loves to chase!

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 16-17 inches (41-43cm) Bitches 15-16 inches (38-41cm)
Weight: Dogs 18-23 pounds (8-10kg) Bitches 18-23 pounds (8-10kg)

Health Problems

Bedlington Terriers may have a serious inherited liver problem known as Copper Storage Disease. They are also prone to hereditary kidney disease, PRA, thyroid problems and eye problems, such as cataracts and retinal disease.

Living Conditions

This breed will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise

These active dogs need plenty of exercise and, like other terriers, will be bored and mischievous without it.

Life Expectancy

About 10-12 years.

Grooming

The coat sheds little to no hair and requires specialized clipping every six weeks, so it is probably best if you learn to do it yourself. The coat is thinned and clipped close to the head and body to accentuate the shape. Shave the ears closely leaving a tassel on the tips. On the legs, the hair is left slightly longer. Have a professional groomer show you how to do it. Brush the dog regularly and clean the pluck inside the ears. Although frequent bathing will not dry out skin as it does on so many other breeds, it should not be washed too often or the coat will become lank, which is not considered appropriate for the breed. Dogs which are to be shown require higher levels of grooming. This breed is considered good for allergy sufferers.

Origin

The Bedlington Terrier was originally named the Rothbury Terrier, after the district of Rothbury on the English border. Gypsy nail makers in Rothbury prized the breed as a hunter of various game including foxes, hares and badgers. In about 1825, a Rothbury dog was mated to a Bedlington bitch, resulting in the Bedlington Terrier. Some sources mention the Otterhound and Dandie Dinmont Terrier as some possible contributors to the breed. Today there are some breeders, especially in England, that will cross Bedlingtons with Whippets and Greyhounds to produce what they call Lurchers. The Bedlington was used as a vermin hunter by the miners of Bedlington who also exploited its gameness as a fighting dog in the pits. Hunters also used them as retrievers. The Bedlington was first exhibited as a separate breed in 1877. Originally it was developed for the hunting of rats and small game in lairs or on open ground (talents it has certainly not forgotten). Today the Bedlington is a good apartment dog. It is also an attentive and barking watchdog.

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Border Collie

The Border Collie is a medium sized bundle of energy, looking rather like a lightly built Australian Shepherd without a bob-tail. The body is slightly longer than the height at the withers. The skull is fairly wide with a distinct stop. The muzzle tapers to the black nose. The ears are usually half-perked. The oval eyes are generally dark brown, except in merles where one or more eyes may be blue. The teeth should meet in a scissors bite. The tail reaches at least to the hock and is sometimes raised when the dog is excited, but is never carried over the back. There are two varieties of Border Collie: one with coarse hair (thick, straight, about 3 inches (7.6 cm.) long), and one with sleek hair (about 1 inch (2.5 cm.) long. The coat colours come in black and white, tri-colour, red & white, black & grey, and all black. White should never be the main colour. The longer haired variety should have a mane and tail brush. The hair on the face, ears and front legs is always short and sleek. Since Border Collies are bred for working ability and intelligence rather than for physical beauty, conformation varies widely.

Temperament

The Border Collie is a very intelligent and responsive dog. It excels at obedience, agility and Frisbee (TM). They thrive on praise, are sensitive and very trainable. The Border Collies are commonly used in the agility competitions, as sports like agility are right the this intelligent dogs alley. The Border Collie is highly energetic with great stamina. Provided it gets sufficient activity to keep it occupied and ample exercise, the Border Collie will get along quite happily with other dogs, and children, however the Border Collie may be aggressive with other dogs of the same sex. They should not be trusted with small non-canine pets, however there are plenty of Border Collies that live and get along with family cats. This breed should be very well socialized as a puppy to prevent shyness. To be truly happy, it needs a lot of: ongoing attention, extensive daily exercise, and a job to do. For those who wish to reach high levels in dog sports, the Border Collie is a gift from heaven. Farmers (for whom the dogs perform work for which they were bred) are also happy with them. It is not surprising that at competitive levels in various sports such as: agility skills, obedience, and sheepdog trials, the Border Collie is represented among the leaders in the sport. They are perfectionist with a permanent will to please. This breed lives for serving you day in and day out. They are not ideal pets for people who have no plans to spend a lot of time with them. These dogs are too intelligent to lie around the house all day with nothing to do. Prospective owners who are looking for just a family pet should consider other similar but calmer breeds, like show line Australian Shepherds and Shetland Sheepdogs. If there is insufficient activity then it will find its own work to do, and that may not be what YOU had in mind when we say the word WORK. They can become destructive if they get bored or if they are ignored. They can become neurotic if they are left alone for long periods, leading to many behaviour problems. This breed is known as an escape artist. Because of his strong herding instincts, the Border Collie may be snappish with children and strangers. They do best with an experienced owner that has lots of time to spend with the dog. The adolescent Border Collie often goes through a phase where he challenges his master's authority. Some are highly reactive and sound sensitive, making them a poor choice for families with young children. Dominance level is highly variable in Border Collies.

Height, Weight

Height:  Dogs 19-22 inches (48-56 cm.) Bitches 18-21 inches (46-53 cm.)
Weight: Dogs 30-45 pounds (14-20 kg.) Bitches 27-42 pounds (12-19 kg.)

Health Problems

They are generally a hardy breed, but some are prone to hip dysplasia, PRA and an eye disease common to Collies known as Collie Eye Anomaly. Many Border Collies are allergic to fleas and some are prone to epilepsy and deafness.

Living Conditions

The Border Collie is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage. This breed will do fine in a kennel provided it has daily activity and sees plenty of its handler. This breed is not suited to life chained up in the back yard all day.

Exercise

Physical exercise alone is not sufficient for this very intelligent and highly energetic dog. They want to work and must do so with body and mind as one, carrying out different tasks. Fast and agile, these lively little dogs have boundless energy and thrive on hard work and play. They are a delight to see streaking after a ball or bringing straying sheep back to the fold.

Life Expectancy

About 12-15 years.

Grooming

The Border Collie needs regular combing and brushing to keep the coat gleaming. Extra care is needed when the soft, dense undercoat is shedding. Bathe or dry shampoo only when necessary. Check the ears and coat regularly for ticks. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

The Border Collie originated in Northumberland on the Scottish/English border. The breed is descended from old British droving breeds with some spaniel added. An outstanding herder, this hardy, agile, untiring sheepdog, is capable of mastering any type of herd. It is said that the Border Collie has an eye that can hypnotize cattle. He crouches down and mesmerizes the animals with its intense stare. One of the most trainable breeds, the Border Collie also serves well as a narcotics and bomb detection dog and is a frequent high performer in obedience, agility, FrisbeeTM trials, police work, search & rescue, Flyball, performing tricks and competitive obedience. Some Border Collies have been trained very successfully as blind guide dogs. Currently very good results are obtained with them for general assistance to the handicapped in The Netherlands.

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Borzoi

The Borzoi is a tall, aristocratic dog with a long, thin, narrow head. A slightly arched muzzle and a long, low-hanging curved tail. Heavy-necked ruff is characteristic. The nose is black and the eyes are oblong and dark. The ears lie back on the neck but may prick up partially when the dog is alert. The back is gracefully curved. The chest is narrow, but very deep. The longish silky coat may be wavy or with large curls, with a heavy mane at the neck. The colours are white, golden, tan or grey with black markings, in either solid or mixed colours.

Temperament

The Borzoi is a sweet, undemanding and undemonstrative dog. They are proud and self aware dogs that are extremely loyal to their family. When necessary they will protect their family. Intelligent and easy to train. The training of this breed has to be based upon mutual respect. They cannot be trained to perform, but they can learn basic requirements for living with you. Cat-like, silent and docile, but can be wilful and snappish if pushed too far. They like to roam and are incredibly fast. Good with other dogs but should not be trusted with small non-canine pets such as cats and rabbits! His lightening snap can kill a small animal in a second. Socialize them very well with cats and other pets at as young an age as possible, but remember the Borzoi will always be a hunter that will race after a fleeing animal. The Borzoi are noble dogs that get along fairly well with children, but it is not ideally suited for being a child's companion as it does not take kindly to teasing and are certainly not playmates. They prize their rest and do not like rough play. They do not like intrusive strangers. During the growing stage, these dogs need a highly nutritional diet.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs at least 28 inches (71cm) Bitches at least 26 inches (66cm)
Weight: Dogs 75-105 pounds (34-48kg) Bitches 60-90 pounds (27-41kg)

Health Problems

They are sensitive to drugs. May be a picky eater and is prone to bloat. It is best to feed the Borzoi small meals two or three times a day. Avoid exercise after meals.

Living Conditions

Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and are so peaceful it might escape notice, but outside they need plenty of space to walk and run - so it will do best with at least an average-sized yard. In the city he should only be let off the lead in a safe, enclosed space.

Exercise

To Maintain their fitness these dogs need plenty of exercise, including regular opportunities to run off the leash, however in some countries it is forbidden to allow all the dogs in this fleet-footed hunting category off the leash. The Borzoi make excellent jogging companions and usually enjoy running alongside a bicycle but beware, a Borzoi is quite likely to shoot off after any prey it catches site of. If this happens you will need to react very quickly.

Life Expectancy

About 10-12 years.

Grooming

The long silky coat is easy to groom. Brush regularly with a firm bristle brush, and dry shampoo when necessary. Bathing presents a problem with such a tall dog but shouldn't be required very often. Clip the hair between the toes to keep the feet comfortable and to stop them from spreading. This breed is a seasonally heavy shedder.

Origin

The Borzoi was probably first brought from Arabia to Russia in about 1600. There, this elegant sight hound was adopted by the nobility, crossed with longer haired sheepdogs and used as a fierce and brave wolf hunter, earning the name Russian Wolfhound. The Russian nobility bred and hunted with these dogs for hundreds of years. Eventually the Borzoi's popularity spread throughout Europe. Queen Victoria owned Borzoi's, and many of the British aristocracy soon followed suit. The breed became favoured for gifts among royalty. The Borzoi became more docile as his use as a companion dog increased. The name comes from the Russian word 'borzii' which means swift. The Borzois talents include hunting, sighting and lure coursing.

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Bull Terrier

A thick-set muscular, well-proportioned animal, the Bull Terrier has a short, dense coat that comes in pure white, black, brindle, red, fawn and tri-colour. Its most distinctive feature is its head, which is almost flat at the top, sloping evenly down to the end of the nose with no stop. The eyes are small, dark, almond-shaped and closely set. The body is full and round, while the shoulders are robust and muscular and the tail is carried horizontally.

Temperament

Though this breed was once a fierce gladiator, he is much gentler now. A Bull Terrier might have a preventive effect and it might defend it's owner in a truly critical situation, but it isn't breed to be a guard dog. Courageous, scrappy, fun-loving, active, clownish and fearless. The Bull Terrier is a loyal, polite, and obedient dog. They become very attached to their owners. The Bull Terrier thrives on affection and makes a fine family pet. Bull Terriers like to be doing something and fit in well with active families where they receive a great deal of companionship and supervision. They do not do well in situations where they are left alone for 8 hours a day. This breed can be a wonderful pet if very thoroughly socialized and trained, but not recommended for most households. Fond of both grown-ups and children, but may be too energetic for small children. They cannot tolerate teasing and children should be taught to respect the dog. They can be very protective and wilful. Do not encourage this breed to be possessive or jealous. Bull Terriers may try to join into family rough housing or quarrel. They need very firm training and lots of exercise. Bull Terriers must be given a lot of companionship, or they may become destructive. Be sure to socialize them well. They can be extremely aggressive with other dogs. Unaltered males usually do not get along with other male dogs. Males and females can live together happily and two females can also be a good combination with care and supervision. They are not recommended with other pets. They make excellent watch dogs. This breed can be somewhat difficult to train.

Height, Weight

Standard Bull Terrier
Height: 20-24 inches (51-61 cm.) Weight: 45-80 pounds (20-36 kg.)
Miniature Bull Terrier
Height: 10-14 inches (25-33 cm)  Weight: up to 24-33 pounds (11-15 kg)

Health Problems

Bull Terriers are generally healthy, but some are prone to suffer from a zinc deficiency, which can cause death. Some pups are born deaf. Some suffer from obsessive compulsive behaviours, such as tail chasing. Some bloodlines are prone to slipped patella (dislocation of the kneecaps). Some male Bull Terriers have an overabundance of testosterone, which makes them too territorial. Neutering often fixes the problem - mellowing the dog out some. Can be sensitive to fleas or other parasites. Prone to weight gain allergy troubles and bad knees. White Bull Terriers are prone to deafness.

Living Conditions

Bull Terriers will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and a small yard will do. They prefer warm climates.

Exercise

This breed needs vigorous daily exercise, but they should always be on a lead in public at all times, because they will fight with other dogs. The Bull Terrier has a tendency to become overweight and lazy if it is not properly exercised.

Life Expectancy

About 10-12 years

Grooming

The Bull Terrier is easy to groom. An occasional combing and brushing will do. This breed is an average shedder, shedding twice a year. You can remove loose hair by a daily rubdown with a special rubber glove. White hairs are more noticeable than the coloured ones on furniture and clothes.

Origin

In 1830, when combats between Bulldogs and bulls were at there height, lovers of this "sport" decided to create a dog that would attack even more agilely. By crossing the Bulldog with the Old English Terrier and adding a bit of Spanish Pointer blood, they came up with the Bull Terrier. However, Bull Terriers were not the most successful fighters. In 1850 the white-coated variety (nicknamed the "White Cavalier") was obtained and soon became a fashionable pet of the gentry. The breed has been used as a guard, ratter, herder and watchdog. The Miniature was developed to have the same qualities in a dog of more manageable size.

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Collie (Rough & Smooth)

A lovely, active, and agile, long-coated sheepdog made famous by the movie star, Lassie. The lean, blunted, wedge-shaped head gives an impression of lightness. The top of the head is flat. The face is chiselled. The long, smooth, well-rounded, blunt muzzle tapers to a black nose. The ears are 3/4 erect with the tips folding forward. The eyes are almond-shaped and dark except in the case of blue merles that may have blue or merle eyes. The trim, but muscular, body is slightly longer than it is tall. The chest is strong and fairly wide. The tailbone hangs down to the dog's hocks. In the Rough variety, an abundant double coat forms a mane around the neck and chest. The coat needs regular weekly grooming to look its best. The Smooth variety has a one-inch coat that needs very little grooming. With both varieties the hair on the head and legs is short and smooth. They both come in sable and white, tri-colour (black, white & tan), blue merle or predominantly white with sable, tri-colour or blue merle markings.

Temperament

A noble, highly intelligent dog. Sensitive, sweet, kind, easy to train and loyal. Usually good with other pets and friendly with other dogs. Very devoted to and protective of his loved ones. One Collie travelled 2000 miles to find his family after he became lost. Collies have received the Ken-L-Ration Hero Dog award 5 times. An excellent children's companion, playful and gentle, with some exceptions. Can be wilful and must be trained gently or he will refuse to cooperate. Some exhibit herding behaviour as puppies, nipping at people's heels. Adult dogs generally outgrow this behaviour. Collie puppies housetrain quickly, generally in about a week (after about 10-12 weeks old). They are good-natured, friendly, dogs. They are energetic outdoors. They can be wary of strangers, stubborn and indolent. It has a fairly good sense of protectiveness for its master, especially for children. They are not aggressive, but they do tend to be suspicious of people they do not like.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 24-26 inches (61-66cm.) Bitches 22-24 inches (56-61cm.)
Weight: Dogs 60-75 pounds (27-34kg.) Bitches 50-65 pounds (23-29kg.)

Health Problems

Generally healthy dogs. Some lines are prone to PRA, eye defects and hip problems leading to acute lameness and arthritis. Seeing your veterinarian is advisable for a clearance certificate before purchasing a puppy. The tip of a Collies nose can be sensitive to the sun. Buy only from a reputable breeder. The Collie is a very popular breed resulting in the sale of many inferior animals with poor health and/or temperaments.

Living Conditions

The Collie will dog okay in an apartment as long as they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Sensitive to the heat. Provide plenty of shade and fresh water in warm weather.

Exercise

The Collie needs plenty of exercise, preferably some of it off the leash.

Life Expectancy

About 14-16 years

Grooming

The spectacular stiff coat sheds dirt readily and a thorough weekly brushing will keep it in good condition. Take extra care when the soft dense undercoat is being shed. The Smooth variety has a one-inch coat and should be brushed every one to two weeks. If the long coated variety has a BIG matt, and the dog is not being used for show, the matt may need to be cut out, as opposed to combed out, as to avoid pain to the dog. Bathe or dry shampoo as necessary. This breed sheds heavily twice a year.

Origin

For centuries the Rough Coated Collie was hardly known outside Scotland, but it is now one of the world's most popular breeds. Descended from generations of hard- working herding dogs, it is a conscientious creature of immense intelligence. They are used as water rescue dogs and have served man as sheepdogs for centuries, guarding and herding flocks. The breed's name probably comes from its charge; the Scottish black-faced sheep called the Colley. Early Rough Collies were smaller, with broader heads and shorter muzzles. The Collie is so intelligent that he has been trained for many purposes, as a rescue dog, guide for the blind, movie star, and as a guard dog. Queen Victoria kept Collies at Balmoral Castle in Scotland and her interest launched the breed's subsequent popularity. J.P. Morgan and other members of the upper class have owned Collies. At this point Collies were mixed with the Borzoi, and *ALL* show dogs had to have the Borzoi influence for them to win in the show ring. The working dogs separated, branched out and became the different breeds (with the Scotch Collie remaining) and the show type became what we see now, the large dogs with flatter faces. The Collies great beauty has made them a favourite show dog and family companion. The Smooth Collie is more popular as a companion dog in Great Britain than in the United States, though he is gaining popularity in the U.S. today. The Smooth Collie is the same as the Rough Collie, but without the long coat. The AKC considers the Rough and Smooth Collies as varieties of the same breed. They are judged by the same standard with the exception of the coat.  The first Collie was presented at a dog show in 1860.

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German Shepherd

The German Shepherd Dog is also known as the Alsatian. It is handsome, well proportioned and very strong. The coat most often comes in black with tan, sable or all black, but also can come in blue, liver and white, but those colours are considered a fault according to most standards. White is not an acceptable colour for the German Shepherd, however they are now being recognized as a separate breed, called the American White Shepherd. The nose is black most often black but, blue or liver still do sometimes occur, but is considered a fault can not be shown. It has a sturdy, muscular, slightly elongated body with a light but solid bone structure. Its head should be in proportion to its body, and the forehead a little convex. It has a strong scissors bite, ears wide at the base, pointed, upright, and turned forward (the ears of puppies under six months may droop slightly). The eyes are almond-shaped, never protruding, dark, with a lively, intelligent expression. Its bushy tail reaches almost to its hocks and hangs down when the dog is at rest. Its front legs and shoulders are muscular; its thighs thick and sturdy. It has round feet with very hard soles. There are three varieties of the German Shepherd: rough-coated, long rough-coated, and the long-haired.

Temperament

Often used as working dogs, German Shepherds are direct and fearless, eager and alert. Bold, cheerful, obedient and eager to learn. Known for their tremendous loyalty and courage. Calmly confident, but not hostile. Serious and almost human in his intelligence. They have a high learning ability. German Shepherds love to be close to their families, but they are very wary of strangers. This breed needs his people and should not be left isolated for long periods of time. They only bark when it is necessary. German Shepherds have a very strong protective instinct, so they should be extensively socialized to prevent over-guarding when they are an adult. Aggression and attacks on people are largely due to poor breeding, handling and training. A well bred, well-adjusted, and trained dog is for the most part generally good with other pets and excellent with children in the family. They must be firmly trained in obedience from an early age. It is extremely important to purchase your German Shepherd from a reputable breeder. Some are timid and skittish and may be prone to fear biting. Research a puppy's lineage carefully. To be successful pets, these dogs should be trained and socialized from an early age with a firm and loving hand. Coercive or angry training does not succeed well with these dogs. To be truly happy, the German Shepherd needs a task in life. The breed is so intelligent and learns so readily that it has been used as a sheepdog, guard dog, in police work, as a guide for the blind, in search and rescue service, and in the military. The German Shepherd also excels in many other dog activities including schutzhund, tracking, obedience, agility, flyball, and ring sport. His fine nose can sniff out drugs and intruders, and can alert handlers to the presence of underground mines in time to avoid detonation, or gas leaks in a pipes buried 15 feet underground. The German Shepherd is also a popular show and family companion.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 24-26 inches (60-65cm.) Bitches 22-24 inches (55-60cm.)
Weight: 77-85 pounds (35-40kg.)

Health Problems

Indiscriminate breeding has lead to hereditary diseases such as hip and elbow dysplasia, (be sure both parents have had their hips certified at least OFA good) blood disorders, digestive problems (probably due to nerves), epilepsy, chronic eczema, keratitis (inflammation of the cornea), dwarfism and flea allergies.

Living Conditions

The German Shepherd will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least a large yard.

Exercise

German Shepherd Dogs love strenuous activity, preferably combined with training of some kind, for these dogs are very intelligent and crave a good challenge.

Life Expectancy

Around 13 years.

Grooming

This breed sheds bits of hair constantly and is a seasonally heavy shedder. A quick daily brushing is best unless hair in the house is not a problem. They should be bathed rarely, only once or twice a year to avoid skin oil depletion.

Origin

Using long-haired, short-haired, and wire-haired local shepherd dogs from Wurtemberg, Thurginia, and Bavaria, von Stephanitz and other dedicated breeders produced a responsive, obedient, and handsome German Shepherd. In April 1899, Capt. Max von Stephanitz registered a dog named Horan as the first Deutsche Schäferhunde, which means German Shepherd Dog in English. Until 1915, both long-haired and wire-haired varieties were exhibited. Today, in most countries, only the short coat is recognized for show purposes. It was presented at Hanover in 1882, and the short-haired variety was first presented in Berlin in 1889.

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Greyhound

A sleek, contoured dog built for speed with a very deep chest and an extraordinarily flexible, curved spine. The head is long with almost no stop and the muzzle tapers. The skull is wide between the ears. The small rose ears are folded back. The eyes are dark and the neck is long and graceful. The front legs are absolutely straight. The hindquarters are very powerful and muscular with an arched loin. The long tail is carried low and has a slight upward curve at the end. The short, smooth coat comes in all dog colours.

Temperament

Sensitive, sweet and elegant. Brave and loyal, but can be wilful. The Greyhound is very intelligent, but its character is often undervalued because of its reserved behaviour toward its master and toward strangers. Socialize them at an early age to prevent timidity. As a rule, they are gentle and even-tempered - both racing lines and show lines. Here's a comment from the book "THE GREYHOUND," by D.Stern:

"Of course, no matter what type of Greyhound you choose, your are in for a treat. The Greyhound is an affectionate, gentle, graceful creature that has kept human beings company for thousands of years."

Most Greyhounds have a definite prey instinct. It is instinctive for these dogs to chase anything that moves quickly. They are extremely fast and some will kill cats and other domestic animals, although this is not the majority (only about 20% of ex-racers are too "keen" on chasing prey to ever be safe with small animals). About 10% are immediately okay due to low prey instinct, and the rest can be trained to leave cats and other small pets in the home alone. They seldom present difficulties with other dogs and are normally good with children. Indoors, these dogs are calm and sociable to a point where they can even be considered lazy. They bond strongly with their own people, have tremendous stamina, and do not bark much. Greyhounds are not particularly vigilant. Show lines tend to be a bit heavier and bred more for temperament than racing lines, therefore dogs from show lines often make better pets, but racing lines can also make wonderful pets. Ex-racing Greyhounds are not usually difficult to housebreak. They are already crate trained from the track, so it doesn't take them long to learn that they are not to "go" in the house.

Height, Weight

Height: Dogs 28-30 inches (71-76cm) Bitches 27-28 inches (68-71cm)
Weight: Dogs 65-70 pounds (29-32kg) Bitches 60-65 pounds (27-29kg)

Health Problems

May be prone to bloat. It is better to feed them 2 or 3 small meals rather than one large one. They are sensitive to drugs, including insecticides.

Living Conditions

The Greyhound will do okay in an apartment if they get enough exercise. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. Greyhounds are sensitive to the cold but do well in cold climates as long as they wear a coat outside.

Exercise

Greyhounds that are kept as pets should have regular opportunities to run free on open ground as well as have long, brisk walks, preferably at the same time every day. Greyhounds love a regular routine.

Life Expectancy

About 10-12 years.

Grooming

The smooth, short-haired coat is very easy to groom. Simply comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and dry shampoo only when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

This very ancient breed is the fastest dog in the world and can reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour (65 km/h). Its greatest gift is its speed. They are thought to have originally descended from the Arabian Sloughi and brought to England by traders before 900 AD. Centuries ago it was used in the hunting of deer and wild boar. It could catch them and pull them down without stopping. It is also an incorrigible enemy of domestic animals, especially cats and geese. Today they are used primarily in dog racing (where they chase mechanical rabbits). This sport is especially popular in Anglo-Saxon countries. After retiring from a racing career, these dogs are often destroyed. Greyhound Rescue groups select the most even-tempered, gentle racers for placement into homes, with excellent success. Their talents include hunting, sighting, watch dogging, racing, agility, and lure coursing.

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Ibezan Hound

The Ibezan Hound, also called Podenco Ibicenco, is an agile, deer-like, elegant and athletic hound that has a long, arched neck, long wedge-shaped head, amber eyes and very large, triangular ears which stand up when the dog is alert. The teeth are exceptionally healthy. The rose or flesh-collared nose has a slightly convex shape called "Roman nose." The body is fine-boned, but not as slender as in many other sight hounds. The Ibezan Hound has flat, sleek muscles without any heaviness. The front legs are perfectly straight all the way from the elbows to the ground. Dewclaws may be removed or left natural. The tail is long and slender, hanging low when the dog is relaxed and carried a bit higher when the dog is alert. The Ibezan Hound is "hare-footed," with long toes. There are three varieties of Ibezan: smooth-haired, long-haired, and wire-haired. The most common is the smooth-haired and the long-haired is very rare. The wire-haired has a longer coat of rough hair that is softer textured than the other two varieties. Colours are white & red, white & tan, or solid white or red.

Temperament

The Ibezan Hounds, sometimes called "Beezers" by their fanciers, are quiet, clean, playful and polite. Good with children, gentle, sensible and sensitive. Protective and somewhat independent. They will hold back watchfully with strangers. Once they decide the stranger means no harm, they will relax very quickly. Be careful with small pets such as rabbits, cats and rodents; the Ibezan Hound is bred to hunt these creatures. Cats that are raised with the Ibezan Hound will fit in just fine as part of the "family pack," but it will chase and possibly kill a cat it does not know. As in all breeds, the Ibezan Hound should be well socialized with other dogs, other animals, adults, and children. If you have an adult Ibezan Hound and would like another dog, it is suggested that you get a puppy. Beezers are pack animals by nature, so introducing a puppy to the household is easier. An Ibezan thinks its humans are their pack, so any addition (human or baby) must be introduced slowly. Ibezans are members of the family. They cannot be kept as kennel dogs. They love their humans, are as clean as a cat, and respect the rules of a household. This breed blushes when they get excited, as does the Pharaoh Hound. Ibezans like to learn and do so very quickly. They are trainable, but tend to be wilful and get bored easily. Provided they have been properly trained, they can participate in many types of dog sports. These dogs are very sensitive to the voice of their handler and a friendly request will always achieve more than a gruff command. This breed tends to have  large litters.

Height, Weight

Height: 22-29 inches (56-74 cm.)
Weight: 42-55 pounds (19-25 kg.)

Health Problems

The Ibezan Hound is hardy and strong, but can have allergic reactions to drugs, including insecticides and flea powders. Some lines seem to be prone to seizures. The Ibezan Hound has a genetic propensity for Axonal Dystrophy, nerve and muscle disease.

Living Conditions

The Ibezan Hound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. The Ibezan Hound can jump very high from a complete standstill, enabling him to easily jump most fences. An incredibly fast dog, the Ibezan Hound can be extremely difficult to re-capture. They are sight hounds, meaning they hunt by sight rather than scent. Ibezans have selective hearing and an independent nature. They will take off running and WILL NOT come back until they feel like it. The strong chase instinct and lack of caution in traffic can lead to disaster. A large fenced area is best for regular exercise. Breed Club literature suggests at least 40X60 feet. The breed is quite sensitive to cold, as his coat is not very protective.

Exercise

This breed requires a great deal of exercise. If there is not a good-sized fenced-in area for them to run, it should have at least two to three long walks a day. This breed should get a chance to stretch its legs with a nice run once a day. They will highly enjoy retrieving for you and will also enjoy running alongside your bicycle, but don't do this until your dog is fully grown as it can harm a young puppy. Do not let this breed off the lead unless you are in a secure area. This independent sight hound is extremely fast and it will take off and not come back until it is good and ready to. They are extremely hard to recapture. Keep in mind that the Ibezan Hound can jump very high from a complete standstill, enabling him to easily jump most fences.

Life Expectancy

About 10-12 years.

Grooming

There are three varieties of Ibezan: smooth-haired, long-haired, and wire-haired. Neither variety requires much attention. The shine on the coat of the smooth-haired can be kept in good condition by occasionally running a rubber glove over it. The wire-haired do not need hand-plucking. All can be groomed by an occasional brushing. Check at frequent intervals that the ear passages are clean and keep the claws short. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

Several examples of Ancient Egyptian art, some from 5000 years ago, depict dogs closely resembling today's Ibezan Hound. This sleek hunting Greyhound may have been brought to the islands off the coast of Spain from Egypt by Phoenician traders in about 700-900 BC. The breed became common on the island of Ibiza and other nearby islands and were used there to hunt rabbit and other small game. The Ibezan Hound is a very fast dog that can hunt on all types of terrain - working by sight, hearing and smell. It can also be used in nocturnal hunting. He is a steady pointer when he discovers game, and can also retrieve very well. Spanish hunters run these dogs in packs. Today the breed's chasing instincts can flourish in the sport of lure coursing. The Ibezan Hound is also a delightful companion and show dog. This breed is very similar to the Pharaoh Hound, but the Ibezan Hound is larger and can have a multi-collared coat. The Ibezan Hound was fully recognized by the AKC in 1979.

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Irish Wolfhound

A massive, muscular dog, the Irish Wolfhound is one of the tallest breeds in the world. This gentle giant can reach the size of a small pony. Standing on his hind legs the Irish Wolfhound can reach up to 7 feet tall!  He has a rough, shaggy coat and wiry bushy eyebrows. Colours include grey, brindle, red, black or white. Gray is the most common colour. The paws are large and round, with markedly arched toes and strong, curved nails. It has a long head with a moderately pointed muzzle and a muscular arched neck. The chest is very deep and it has a well retracted abdomen. The shoulders are strong. The Irish Wolfhound gives the appearance of both strength and grace. The tail hangs down with a slight curve. The ears are carried back against the head except when the animal is excited, when they my prick up part-way.

Temperament

Irish Wolfhounds are sweet-tempered, patient, generous, thoughtful and very intelligent. Excellent, and can be trusted with, children. Dignified and willing, they are unconditionally loyal to their owner and family. Not a guard dog by nature, but may be a deterrent simply due to his size. They tend to greet everyone as a friend, so do not count on them being a watch dog. This giant breed can be clumsy. Slow to mature, it takes two whole years before they are full grown. However, they grow rapidly and high-qualify food is essential. Let a puppy decide for itself how much exercise it wants. Forced exercise and long distance walks are too taxing for this dog's body when it is young. The Irish Wolfhound is relatively easy to train. He responds well to firm, but gentle training. This approach with plenty of understanding will go a long way because this dog quickly grasps what you intend. Make sure the young dog is given as much self-confidence as possible and that you are always consistent with it, so that it grows into an equable, confident dog. Teach it not to pull on its leash before it gets too strong. This calm dog gets along well with other dogs. This is also true with other animals if the dog has gotten to know them when it was still young. However, it  might "course" a smaller dog in an open yard.

Height, Weight

Height: 28-35 inches (71-90 cm.)
Weight: 90-150 pounds (40-69 kg.)

Health Problems

These dogs are prone to cardiomyopathy, bone cancer, bloat, PRA, Von Willebrands, and hip dysplasia.

Living Conditions

The Irish Wolfhound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. You must have a lot of room in your home, heart, yard and car to successfully own this giant breed. They need to be part of the family and would be very unhappy in a kennel. Being sight hounds, they will chase and so need a secure, fenced area for exercise.

Exercise

These giant dogs need lots of space to run, but do not need any more exercise than smaller breeds. They will adapt to their families situation, but would love to go for long walks with its family. Puppies should be allowed to choose how much exercise it needs. Too much forced exercise is not good for its growth and development.

Life Expectancy

About 6-8 years

Grooming

The rough, medium-length coat needs regular and thorough grooming with a brush and comb. This with keep the coat in good condition. About once or twice a year pluck the coat to remove excess dead hair. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

Their ancestors were the Cu, a massive shaggy-coated dog used for the pursuit of wolves, elk and wild boar. Irish Wolfhounds were often given as royal presents and eventually became such popular gifts that Oliver Cromwell had to stop their export from Britain. The last wolf was killed in Scotland in the early eighteenth century, and the Wolfhound disappeared from Ireland in 1766. This breed was later brought back to Ireland by the Romans. There it was carefully breed in the second half of the 19th century by a British army officer, Captain George Graham. The breed was revitalized by the influx of Great Dane and Deerhound blood.

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Italian Greyhound

The Italian Greyhound is an elegant, miniature fine-boned Greyhound with a long head thinning gradually to a pointed muzzle. It has a dark nose, thin lips and a healthy scissors bite. Like his larger cousins, the brisket is deep, the abdomen tucked-in, and the back arched. The fine narrow ears fold back along the head, but rise perpendicular to the head when the dog is alert. The neck is long and thin. The expressive eyes are large and dark. The tail is straight ending in a slight curve. The Italian Greyhound has an easy-care short, sleek coat in solid grey, slate grey, cream, red, fawn, black, or blue - often broken up with white markings on the chest and feet, or white with colour markings. A flecked version also exists but are not accepted in all countries. The Italian Greyhound has a high-stepping gait.

Temperament

The Italian Greyhound is a gentle, submissive and affectionate dog. They become very attached to their masters and can be reserved with strangers. Playful and intelligent, generally these dogs are not difficult to train provided their handler is consistent with them. They are often naughty and are aware of it. It is important that you can see the funny side when things go wrong but this does not mean allowing them to take advantage of you. This dog can be high strung and timid and must be handled very gently. This is a pet for a quiet household where there are no lively children, although they do get along well with behaved children and other dogs and cats. In a stressful situation it needs constant reassurance by stroking. They are very dependent and peaceful. It can be snappish if it is frightened. This breed can be difficult to housebreak. They are generally easy to get along with and take care of. This dog is extremely fast! Young Italian Greyhounds are very active. They can climb wire fencing and are very inquisitive - jumping from chair to table tops to nearby furniture. They are not good companions for large dogs. They do get along well with other Italian Greyhounds and some recommend that you have more than one of this fine breed.

Height, Weight

Height: 12-15 inches (30-38 cm.)
Weight: 6-10 pounds (3-5 kg.)
There are two weight varieties: 8 pounds (4 kg.) maximum, and over 8 pounds (4 kg.).

Health Problems

The Italian Greyhound is hardier than it appears. The adult dog is certainly not delicate but until they are about eighteen months old, their bones are quite fragile and they can break a leg rather easily. Italian Greyhounds are prone to slipped stifle, fractures, PRA and epilepsy. Bitches whelp easily and are well-suited to motherhood.

Living Conditions

The Italian Greyhound is good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is very sensitive to cold temperatures and should wear a sweater to go out in the cold weather.

Exercise

Italian Greyhounds are active little dogs who enjoy a good walk and love to run free and play. Because Italian Greyhounds like to play by running and bumping into each other, play with groups of other Italian Greyhounds should always be supervised to prevent accidental injury. Play with other large dogs is not recommended. Italian Greyhounds may be a good jogging companion for short distances, but they do better as a walking companion.

Life Expectancy

About 12-15 years.

Grooming

The Italian Greyhound is one of the easiest dogs to groom. All that is needed to keep the fine, silky coat gleaming is a rubdown with a piece of towelling or chamois. Only bathe when absolutely necessary. After bathing make sure the dogs is thoroughly dry and warm. The teeth should be brushed regularly to keep tarter from building up, and the toenails should be kept trimmed. This breed sheds little to no hair.

Origin

The Italian Greyhound is a very old Greyhound. Interestingly, a dog similar to the Italian Greyhound of today was found in a 6000 year old Egyptian tomb. Like the Greyhound, this breed was brought to Europe by the Phoenicians. The breed was later developed by the Romans. As evidence, a small Greyhound was found in an ancient lava flow in Pompeii. During the sixteenth century, this delicate dog became popular with European nobility, and is portrayed in many paintings of that time. The breed was favoured by Catherine the Great of Russia, James I of England, Anne of Denmark and Queen Victoria, among others. Frederick the Great of Prussia liked his little Italian Greyhound so much, he even took one to war with him. When his Italian Greyhound died, he buried him with his own hands on the grounds of his Sands Souci Palace. In 1991, Frederick's family granted his dying wishes and transferred his remains to Sans Souci, and placed them beside his little Italian Greyhound. A nineteenth century African chieftain was so taken with these graceful dogs that he offered 200 cattle in exchange for a single specimen. The Italian Greyhound is an excellent companion dog.

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Pharaoh Hound

The Pharaoh Hound is a graceful, athletic sight hound. The muscles are lithe, never heavy. The head is wedge-shaped and chiselled. The flat skull and muzzle are long and slim. The small eyes are amber or light brown. The ears are very large and stand erect. The nose is tan and speckled with pink. The teeth should meet in a scissors bite. The jaw is powerful. The neck is fairly long and slightly arched. The brisket is deep and the abdomen moderately tucked up. The whip-like tail is carried down, thick at the root, tapering to a point. The front legs are straight. Removal of the dewclaws is optional. The coat is short and glossy in red or tan, often with white markings. A white tip on the tail is preferred. A white star on the chest, white on toes and/or a thin white line down the centre of the face are permitted. Any white on the back of the dog is a disqualification.

Temperament

The Pharaoh Hound is reasonably independent and a most pleasant companion dog. It is peaceful in the house, loves to play, is calm, loyal, brave and loving. Quiet, naturally well-behaved and intelligent. This breed loves children, but treats strangers with reserve. When the dog is excited, it blushes, with his nose and ears turning a glowing deep rose. The Pharaoh Hound should not be too difficult to train. The handler needs to be understanding of the dog's character and to be consistent in approach. It can do well in competitive obedience. Socialize the Pharaoh well at an early age to avoid timidity. Generally good with other dogs, but can be rather dominant toward other male dogs. This breed is very fast and likes to chase things. A fast hunter, it should not be trusted with rabbits, cats and other small non-canine pets. Don't let this dog off the leash except in a safely contained area.

Height, Weight

Height:  Dogs 23-25 inches (59-63 cm.) Bitches 21-24 inches (53-61 cm.)
Weight:  45-55 pounds (20-25 kg.)

Health Problems

This is a very healthy and hardy breed, but beware, the Pharaoh can be highly sensitive to insecticides and medicines.

Living Conditions

The Pharaoh Hound will be okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. It needs soft bedding and warmth and generally should not be expected to sleep outside except in warm climates... but it would still prefer to sleep with its family. This breed likes to chase things and should not be let off the leash unless it is in a safe area. They can go far away from you if they spy or scent wild game because they never loose their instinct to hunt alone. To prevent this you will need a secure, high fence around your yard. They can jump very high to get out of a space.

Exercise

The Pharaoh Hound relishes the opportunity to stretch its legs in a safe area - with frequent long runs. Try to set aside an hour each day to bicycle while the dog runs alongside you on a leash, although it can manage with a long daily walk on the leash and occasional sprints.

Life Expectancy

About 11-14 years.

Grooming

The Pharaoh Hound needs little grooming. It is only necessary to remove dead and loose hair with a rubber brush. Bathe or dry shampoo only when necessary. The Pharaoh Hound is a clean dog with no doggy odour. This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

The Pharaoh Hound is one of the oldest domesticated dog breeds in the world (estimated to have originated around 4000 to 3000 B.C.)  The breed's exact origin has been lost in the sands of time, but one belief is it began in Ancient Egypt, where a lithe, red, prick-eared sight hound, undeniably the close and direct ancestor of today's Pharaoh Hound, was used to hunt and chase down small game using its keen eyesight, sense of smell, and acute hearing.  Through numerous Egyptian artefacts and writings, we have learned that this unique dog was treasured not only as an adept and able hunter, but also as a loyal and intelligent companion to the royal pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. For the past 2000 years, however, the Mediterranean island of Malta has been exclusively responsible for preserving and developing the breed into the Pharaoh Hound we know today. Since it has been living exclusively in the islands of Malta since time immemorial, the breed's origin is internationally recognized as Malta. The Maltese Islands are situated in the centre of the Mediterranean about 50 miles south of Sicily. In Malta the hound is known as the Kelb Tal-Fenek which literally translated means "Dog of the rabbit." The main task of the Kelb Tal-Fenek is to hunt wild rabbits. Ancient Maltese farmers and hunters highly appreciated the Kelb Tal-Fenek as an outstanding rabbit hunter, and still today, many farmers and hunters in Malta take immense pride in owning the Kelb Tal-Fenek. The Kelb Tal-Fenek is both a sight hound as well as a scent hound. His way of hunting its prey is unique, together with its Mediterranean cousins- the Ibezan Hound, the Cirneco Dell Etna, the Portuguese Podengo, and the Podenco Canario. The Kelb Tal-Fenek uses its sense of smell to a marked degree (scent hound) when searching for its prey. When the prey bolts, its sight hound instincts come into play and the hound is in full flight in strong pursuit of its prey. The versatility of the breed does not, however, end here. The Kelb Tal-Fenek is a good guard dog, and also accompanies goats and sheep on their way to the pasture. The Kelb Tal-Fenek occasionally is also used as a gundog to flush and retrieve quail and woodcock. In honour of its importance and heritage, the dog was officially declared Malta's national hound in 1974. Maltese Lira coins were minted in 1977 depicting the Kelb Tal-Fenek on the reverse. During the 1960's Kelb Tal-Feneks were imported to England and to the United States. The breed was recognized by the AKC in 1983.

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Saluki

The appearance of the Saluki is one of total grace and balance. They have an unusual gait when they are at top speed: all four of their legs are in the air at the same time. It has a slim, Greyhound-like body with long silky feathering on the ears and tail. There is also a rarer smooth variety with no feathering. The Smooth coat is generally a bit coarser than the feathered variety's silky coat. The coat comes in black & tan, fawn, white, cream, gold and red, as well as various combinations of these. Salukis with a patch of white in the middle of the forehead are thought by Bedouin tribes to have "the kiss of Allah" and is regarded as special. The head is narrow and well-proportioned, tapering gradually toward the nose. The ears are long and hanging. It has sturdy jaws and large skinny eyes that are either light or dark brown with a sweet, dignified expression. The Saluki's neck is elegant and flexible. Its body is very elongated, with oblique muscular shoulders. The feet are thickly haired between the toes for protection from rough terrain. 

Temperament

The Saluki are even-tempered and sensitive. Gentle, affectionate, but not demonstrative. This loyal dog may become attached to one person. Good with gentle older children. They are too slim for roughhousing. The breed can't take harsh discipline or strictness. They can be trained only with love and consistency. This breed will never be perfectly obedient so do not set your expectations too high. Sensitive and friendly, but somewhat aloof, even with his family. They are fairly submissive to dominant people and dogs and are easily distracted and somewhat skittish (especially with other dogs). The Saluki do best with another Saluki. They are a pleasant and calm companion and make a good watchdog. Though not aggressive with people, the Saluki's natural instinct is to chase and kill non-canine animals. This is a proper function and this trait should not be discouraged within the breed. They may need obedience training to keep their deep-rooted hunting instincts under control, however with few exceptions it has proven impossible to train these dogs not to hunt at all.  As a result, many pets such as birds, guinea pigs and rabbits are not recommended for Saluki owners. They can be good with cats if the cat is left to its own instinctive abilities.

Height, Weight

Height:  23-28 inches (58-71cm.)
Weight: 29-66 pounds (13-30kg.)

Health Problems

The Saluki is prone to some genetic eye diseases and cancer. They can get sunburn especially on the nose.

Living Conditions

The Saluki is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed should sleep indoors. Warm temperatures are most comfortable, but very hot weather can be uncomfortable.

Exercise

The Saluki is a natural athlete that needs a lot of exercise. They are happiest when  running, however many are lost or killed when they are allowed to get free. This very independent dog can never be off its lead except in an isolated, scouted area. These dogs hunt on sight. They will pay no attention to their handler's calls if they are chasing something. In some countries they are not permitted to be left off of their lead at all. Saluki run at top speeds of 40 mph (55km./h) or more with their feet barely touching the ground. These top speeds are reached in short spurts, but they also have exceptional endurance. They are not great for jogging because they will run faster than humans. An excellent way to exercise them is to trot them alongside your bike.

Life Expectancy

About 10-12 years.

Grooming

This odour-free dog's coat is easy to groom. Just occasionally brush and comb, especially on the longer-haired parts of the dog. The ears should be checked regularly to make sure they are clean. The Saluki is an average shedder.

Origin

The royal dog of Egypt, the Saluki may be as old as the oldest known civilization.  They were named after the Arabian city "Saluki" in the Middle East, which is now vanished beneath the sands. Their bodies were often found mummified like the bodies of the Pharaohs themselves, and their pictures appear in ancient Egyptian tombs dating from 2100 BC. This breed is thought of by the Muslims as a sacred gift of Allah, so these dogs were never sold but only offered as gift of friendship or homage. The Saluki is also known as the Gazelle Hound, Arabian Hound, or Persian Greyhound, and as its appearance suggests, it is probably quite closely related to another ancient breed: the Afghan Hound. It is native to the area from eastern Turkestan to Turkey. The Saluki is a brilliant desert sight hunter capable of incredible speed and agility over rough terrain. The Saluki was used to course gazelle, the fastest of the antelopes. They have also been used to hunt fox, jackal, and hare. In the West, this breed is primarily a companion pet and show dog, although they have also been successful as racing dogs.

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Staghound

The American Staghound is not recognized as a breed, but is a type of sight hound that is used to pursue (course) a variety of quarry (game).  Although he is not recognized as a breed, some "lines" have been bred together longer than some recognized modern breeds.  The best way to visualize the American Staghound is to blend together the characteristics of the Scottish Deerhound with the Greyhound.  He is a running dog with the physical characteristics that would be referred to as the Greyhound prototype.  He has long legs, deep chest, and strong muscles.  The Staghound has great visual acuity, and some have been bred for some scenting ability while on course.  He can be found in any assortment of colour or colour patterns that can be found in the Greyhound and Scottish Deerhound.  There are three coat types: the "shag" which more closely resembles the Scottish Deerhound, the "slick" which more closely resembles the Greyhound, and the broken which is in between the two.  The American Staghound has all of the physical and mental characteristics needed for running down his quarry.  He is known for having speeds that approach that of a Greyhound, but unlike a Greyhound, some specimens have incredible endurance.

Temperament

Very calm around the home.  They crave the attention of humans and are very affectionate to their owner.  Although he is primarily used for coursing quarry, the American Staghound makes a wonderful companion.  In recent years there appears to be more interest in the Staghound as a pet.  He is good with children, but his size can pose a problem to the young.  Most Staghounds are wonderful watchdogs due to their excellent vision, but they are not guardians or protective.  Staghounds are very fast but are not hyper active. To some people the Staghound even appears to be a bit lazy around the home once mature.  The coursing instinct in the American Staghound is unsurpassed, so anything that runs may be considered quarry.  In the field he is courageous, tenacious, and very determined that will course anything from a rabbit to a deer.  The Staghound is pack orientated so it may accept other dogs he knows, but pets such as cats are a challenge that may not ever be overcome, however other Staghounds live happily with cats. Staghounds throughout history have been bred for one purpose, TO HUNT!!  Only the best hunters are bred, therefore even puppies raised in a home grow into some very strong hunting instincts.  Most Staghounds are used for hunting predators not prey.  Rather than hunt something like a rabbit that will not fight back when caught, they are instinctively hunting something like a coyote that acts like a wild buzz saw when caught.  They have to be muzzled when unsupervised or running off leash.  They require a special pen to keep them separate from the other animals when the owner is not able to supervise.

Height, Weight

Height: Males 26-30 inches (67-77 cm.) Females 24-27 inches (61-69 cm.)
Weight: Males 55-90 pounds (25-41 kg.) Females 45-75 pounds (20-34 kg.)

Health Problems

There are no known genetic health problems, because most Staghounds have hybrid vigour.  Being bred for countless generations for function, the American Staghound is very healthy.  Due to their low percentage of body fat to muscle ratio, the Staghound is sensitive to anaesthesia.  They should not be run after eating a big portion of food due to torsion bloat concerns.

Living Conditions

Not an apartment dog, but can do well in an urban setting if giving time to exercise in a fenced in yard or taken on walks.  Best suited for rural areas.  The shag variety can acclimate to harsh winter condition, while the slick requires extra attention during cold winter.  Most are kept outdoors, but all prefer the comforts of living in the home.

Exercise

The Staghound requires daily exercise to mature physically and mentally.  Being a calm animal the Staghound doesn’t require exercise to burn off excess energy, but he lives to run.  A daily walk is sufficient, but it is better to obtain a safe place that will provide free running.  The Staghound would be a perfect companion for a person who jogs or rides bike often.

Life Expectancy

12-14 years or more if properly cared for. A true confirmed story of one particular Staghound states that a male sired two litters at 16 years of age!

Grooming

Just a periodic brushing from time to time, depending on type of coat.

Origin

The American Staghound is primarily the result of Scottish Deerhound and Greyhound genetics of unknown genetic percentages.  For the most part, the Staghound has been bred Staghound to Staghound since the 1700’s.  He is not the direct progeny of a pure Scottish Deerhound crossed with a pure Greyhound.  When America was settled the Greyhound, Scottish Deerhound, and possibly their crosses found their way to the New World.  Coursing quarry was used for sport, food, and fur.  For the first time ever, the coyote was coursed with running dogs.  Coursing dogs have been used for wolf in other countries as well as in America, but the coyote posed a new challenge.  The coyote is faster than the wolf, and pound for pound fights as hard as a wolf.  Over the course of settlement and Westward expansion it was found that the cross between the very fast fine boned Greyhound with the more robust Scottish Deerhound gave a mighty fine coursing animal used for coyote in difficult terrain.  The Scottish Deerhound also contributed his rough jacket and better scenting abilities.  Staghound was bred to Staghound and was most often culled specifically for characteristics that favoured the pursuit of coyote.  A few hundred generations of this sort of breeding lead to what many refer to as the epitome of coyote coursing sight hounds.  In essence, the American Staghound was born.  General George A. Custer used the Staghound in 1846 as part of his dog pack that he used to course on a variety of North American animals.  The Staghound has always been in the hands of huntsmen, and without the right to pursue quarry with running dogs the Staghound will go extinct

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Whippet

The Whippet looks like a small Greyhound. He is graceful and slender, but actually quite hardy. The fine dense coat comes in many colours: brindle, black, red, fawn, tigered white or slate blue, either solid-collared or mixed. The muzzle is long and slender and the overall impression is one of streamlined elegance. This miniature-looking Greyhound has small rose-shaped ears, an elegantly arched neck, a deep chest, and its back is long and broad. The abdomen is retracted, and the tail is pointed.

Temperament

The Whippet is intelligent, lively, affectionate, sweet, and docile. This very devoted companion is quiet and calm in the home. This breed should never be roughly trained, for they are extremely sensitive both physically and mentally. Be sure to introduce plenty of variety when training this breed. The best results will be achieved by including games and running but remember, although they are very intelligent and will learn quickly, you will never achieve "perfect" obedience from this breed due to their independent nature. They are good with children of all ages as long as the children do not roughhouse or tease the dog. Whippets are clean, virtually odour free, easy to care for and easy to travel with. They are good watchdogs and may be reserved with strangers. They will pursue and kill cats and other small animals if given the opportunity, but are good with other dogs. Household cats that they are raised with and have become accustom to will be left along. They can be used to hunt. The Whippet's sweet personality makes him a fine companion dog. The Whippet is   the ultimate sprinter, unsurpassed by any other breed in its ability to accelerate to top speed and to twist and turn with matchless dexterity. Some can be difficult to housebreak while others housebreak quickly.

Height, Weight

Height:  Dogs 19 inches (47cm.) Bitches 17 inches (44cm.)
Weight: Dogs 18-28 pounds (8-12kg.) Bitches 12-20 pounds (5-9kg.)

Health Problems

Prone to stomach upset and skin problems.

Living Conditions

This breed is sensitive to the cold. Wearing a coat is advised in the winter. They will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. Whippets are calm indoors and a small yard will do.

Exercise

The Whippet kept as a pet should have regular opportunities to run free on open ground (in a safe area) as well as a brisk daily walk on a leash. They are sight hound and will chase and kill small animals so a fenced yard is essential.

Life Expectancy

About 12-15 years.

Grooming

The Whippet's smooth, fine, short-haired coat is easy to groom. A regular rub all over with a damp chamois will keep the coat gleaming. Brush with a firm bristle brush, and bathe only when necessary. The coat of the Whippet is virtually free of "doggie odour." This breed is an average shedder.

Origin

The Whippet was developed at the end of the 19th century through crossing among the Greyhound, the Italian Greyhound, and the Terrier. Its name derives from the expression "whip it" meaning to move quickly. The Whippet is an outstanding track racer over short distances reaching speeds of up to 37 miles per hour (60km. per hour) - in seconds! Coursing these dogs was an entertaining form of gambling for the lower classes in England. Some of the Whippet's talents include: hunting, sighting, watch dogging, racing, agility, and lure coursing.

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